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Showing posts tagged “IYC1012”

Rosa Maribel Galecio Medina is an employee at APPBOSA, a small producer organization in the Piura Region in Peru. The 28-year-old Rosa Maribel is part of a 200 person work-force at APPBOSA station. 
Here, bananas from surrounding plantations, grown and picked by more than 300 farmers, are sent for cleaning and careful packing in boxes weighing exactly 18,14 kilos before being exported to Europe and USA.
Rosa Maribel has been working at APPBOSA for two years. The stations were built in 2007 with support from the company buying their bananas and technical assistance from Fairtrade International (FLO). 
The bananas are transported from the plantations by a unique 7 kilometre cableway. As a result of the cableway, carrying of the 50 kilo heavy banana bunches is shortened by nearly 450 meters, which also increases the amount of non-blemished bananas suitable for export. These are just a couple of the improvements people at APPBOSA have experienced thanks to the Fairtrade Premium.  
For more producer stories, check out ‘Meet the Producers’ on the Fairtrade International website.

Rosa Maribel Galecio Medina is an employee at APPBOSA, a small producer organization in the Piura Region in Peru. The 28-year-old Rosa Maribel is part of a 200 person work-force at APPBOSA station.

Here, bananas from surrounding plantations, grown and picked by more than 300 farmers, are sent for cleaning and careful packing in boxes weighing exactly 18,14 kilos before being exported to Europe and USA.

Rosa Maribel has been working at APPBOSA for two years. The stations were built in 2007 with support from the company buying their bananas and technical assistance from Fairtrade International (FLO).

The bananas are transported from the plantations by a unique 7 kilometre cableway. As a result of the cableway, carrying of the 50 kilo heavy banana bunches is shortened by nearly 450 meters, which also increases the amount of non-blemished bananas suitable for export. These are just a couple of the improvements people at APPBOSA have experienced thanks to the Fairtrade Premium. 

For more producer stories, check out ‘Meet the Producers’ on the Fairtrade International website.

Small Co-op. Big and Passionate Plans.

With just seven members, Hop Tac Xa Nong Nghiep Chanh Day in Vietnam is probably one of the smallest Fairtrade cooperatives in the world! But just two months after becoming Fairtrade certified they have already sold all 20 tons of their export-quality passionfruit, and received around USD 2,000 in Fairtrade Premium. Xavier and Hung from the Asia producer services team went to visit them.

We start the day with a typical Vietnamese breakfast– a strong Robusta coffee and a bowl of Pho (noodle soup), in a street restaurant. Then we set off on the long drive to the cooperative. The farmers are based in Kien Duc, Dak Nong province, a remote mountainous area of Southern Vietnam bordering Cambodia, and one of the most disadvantaged regions in the country.

There are some large Fairtrade coffee cooperatives further North, but Hop Tac Xa Nong Nghiep Chanh Day is the first Fairtrade cooperative in Vietnam to sell passion fruits. They joined Fairtrade in June with the support of their exporter, V.U.A Biotech.

Now they are already planning how to use the first installment of Fairtrade Premium. Mrs Nguyen Thi Phuong Dong, treasurer of the cooperative and one of two female members, told us that a computer for their office and covering their operational costs are their top priorities. Later, they would like to buy land for other poor farmers and to invest in quality improvement training. They are also considering repairing the village road as some children in the community can’t attend school regularly during the rainy season, when the dirt roads get slippery.

 “The Fairtrade system protects us from losing money and against market instability” says Mrs. Nguyen. Prices for passion fruit vary a lot throughout the year, so this is a big plus. Farmers also now use protective equipment when using pesticides, in line with the Fairtrade Standards, and already feel the benefit to their health.

The cooperative is now looking for additional buyers for their second grade passion fruits. These could easily be sold and processed to make jams or fruit juice, for example. This would bring them additional income and certainly attract new members. Perhaps they won’t stay the smallest cooperative for long!

Tran Ban Hung is the Fairtrade Liaison Officer for Vietnam; Xavier Huchet is the Head of Producer Support & Relations for Asia at Fairtrade International.

Interested in purchasing Fairtrade passion fruit from Vietnam? Contact Xavier: x.huchet@fairtrade.net

When the cooperative was created, 70 percent of members were tenants and sharecroppers. Today, after 10 years, everyone owns their own plots. This has happened to people who had nothing.

Wilson Pedrosa Lima is a Fairtrade coffee farmer at UNIPASV cooperative in Brazil, and features on the front cover of Fairtrade International’s new Annual Report.

(Source: fairtrade)

Omar Valdés is a member of COASABA honey cooperative. We got to see part of his beautiful work, with his beehives and those of his father. Omar Valdés doesn’t own land, so he rents a small piece of property in the outskirts of the city of Santa Bárbara, in the town of Los Mayo. This allows him to leave his bees with access to plenty of food and fresh water, but at the same time it is close to his home. When asked how he thinks his life would be without the cooperative Mr. Omar says: 

My life wouldn’t be the same, neither for my family nor for the region’s beekeeping.

Fairtrade International’s Liaison Officer Ingrid Allende joined COASBA honey cooperative in Chile for their general assembly. The election process was a chance for producers to talk about their organization and their reasons for becoming a cooperative. Read more here…

Omar Valdés is a member of COASABA honey cooperative. We got to see part of his beautiful work, with his beehives and those of his father. Omar Valdés doesn’t own land, so he rents a small piece of property in the outskirts of the city of Santa Bárbara, in the town of Los Mayo. This allows him to leave his bees with access to plenty of food and fresh water, but at the same time it is close to his home. When asked how he thinks his life would be without the cooperative Mr. Omar says: 

My life wouldn’t be the same, neither for my family nor for the region’s beekeeping.


Fairtrade International’s Liaison Officer Ingrid Allende joined COASBA honey cooperative in Chile for their general assembly. The election process was a chance for producers to talk about their organization and their reasons for becoming a cooperative. Read more here…

A sweet trip to the capital of honey continues…Mr. Luis Villarroel Iraira (61), the new elected president of COASBA honey cooperative, has recognized an improvement in his quality of life and that of the producers since they joined Fairtrade. 

“To be part of this cooperative”, he says, “it is necessary to be loyal, to respect the partners and to love the cooperative”.

This has been the key that has kept them together, despite everything. The cooperative is a member of Chile’s national network of beekeepers and prides itself on high technical and sanitary standards. “It is our own business”, adds Iraira with a smile, regarding what has been accomplished throughout the years.
Fairtrade International’s Liaison Officer Ingrid Allende joined COASBA honey cooperative in Chile for their general assembly. The election process was a chance for producers to talk about their organization and their reasons for becoming a cooperative. Read more here…

A sweet trip to the capital of honey continues…

Mr. Luis Villarroel Iraira (61), the new elected president of COASBA honey cooperative, has recognized an improvement in his quality of life and that of the producers since they joined Fairtrade. 

“To be part of this cooperative”, he says, “it is necessary to be loyal, to respect the partners and to love the cooperative”.

This has been the key that has kept them together, despite everything. The cooperative is a member of Chile’s national network of beekeepers and prides itself on high technical and sanitary standards.

“It is our own business”, adds Iraira with a smile, regarding what has been accomplished throughout the years.

Fairtrade International’s Liaison Officer Ingrid Allende joined COASBA honey cooperative in Chile for their general assembly. The election process was a chance for producers to talk about their organization and their reasons for becoming a cooperative. Read more here…

A sweet trip to the capital of honey – Part 1

In an area of widespread poverty thirty five beekeepers got together in 1994 and founded the association COASBA. During Liaison Officer Ingrid Allende’s visit, the cooperative celebrated its general assembly, where they chose the new board. The election was a chance to talk about what the producers think about their organization and their reasons for becoming a cooperative.

COASBA - Cooperativa Apicola Santa Bárbara - is located in the city of Santa Bárbara, a city that was declared the capital of honey in Chile. Being Fairtrade certified beekeepers is a matter of pride for their members, as the sign outside their cooperative shows:



Orgullosos productores de miel certificada Cormecio Justo Fairtrade - Proud producers of honey certified by Fairtrade.

The most obvious benefit of Fairtrade for COASBA is better incomes for the producers. Since joining Fairtrade the beekeepers are earning 20% more for their honey. Each COASBA member has a regular guaranteed income, which enables them to plan.

The Fairtrade Premium is also an important incentive for the partners. COASBA has invested some of the Premium in improving production processes and for administration, which has created several new jobs. COASBA also has built its own processing facilities and has improved the people’s standard of living. In a region where rural poverty is widespread, family finances are far better than before. Crucially, the younger generation can see a future in beekeeping and in running a coop, rather than joining the exodus of young rural unemployed to the bigger towns and cities. COASBA also recently began to provide advisory services for local beekeepers outside the coop, along with programmes in basic beekeeping for the local municipality.

More to come on COASBA soon….

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