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Showing posts tagged “Honey”

Sandri Lizeth Garcia Herrera, 20, holds a frame of honeycomb before putting it into a centrifuge. She is a member of Cooperativa Integral de Produccion Apicultores de Cuilco (CIPAC), a Fairtrade-certified honey-producing organization in Cuilco, Guatemala.
She is also featured on the cover of our latest monitoring and impact report. For more than 120 pages of the who, what, where and why of Fairtrade, read about it and download it here.

Sandri Lizeth Garcia Herrera, 20, holds a frame of honeycomb before putting it into a centrifuge. She is a member of Cooperativa Integral de Produccion Apicultores de Cuilco (CIPAC), a Fairtrade-certified honey-producing organization in Cuilco, Guatemala.

She is also featured on the cover of our latest monitoring and impact report. For more than 120 pages of the who, what, where and why of Fairtrade, read about it and download it here.

Enjoy this post from Zhuoya Lu, the Fairtrade Liaison Officer in China. Lu attended the 2013 General Assembly of the Jiyuan Huakang Beekeeper Professional Association (JHBPA) and presented a workshop on Fairtrade to the group.
Meet Chaogun Cui (left) and Yonghe Wei from JHBPA. In November I joined 242 beekeepers from different regions gathered in Jiyuan, China, for the association’s annual general assembly.
The chairman of JHBPA presented a report on the past year and the 2014 work plan. It had been a difficult year with bad weather in the summer and low yields and quality. Hoping to keep up motivation for the next year, JHBPA gave out awards for the best quality of organic honey, the highest yield, and highest average production (per beehive). Some beekeepers, like Yonghe, received more than 2000 Yuan (450 Euros).
“2013 was a good year for me. With 15 tonnes of production, I received the award for  highest total production and highest average production per beehive. I’m happy,” said Yonghe Wei, who manages 150 beehives with his wife.
“At the end of year, we plan to travel to Hubei to raise bees there and wait until next spring’s blooming season. The beekeeping is hard work, we spend almost ten months per year outdoors and often spend the Chinese spring festival far away from our families.”
Chaoqun Cui, the other beekeeper in the photo, is the youngest in the association at 21 years of age. He follows in his father’s footsteps, also a member of association.
“Beekeeping is different from farming, the know-how is very important. Besides that, the climate and the location also determine the final production,” Cui said.
He wants to learn more from his father. He now owns 86 beehives. Cui is satisfied with his annual income of around 50 000 Yuan (6250 Euros) because he still lives with his parents and doesn’t have many expenses for daily life.
The association is a stable buyer for him and the price offered is quite good. He sells some honey to individuals, but he sells most of the product to the association. 
The chairman of JHBPA explained to me that they plan to spend this year’s Premium money on beekeeping medicine and beehives for members, and some to pay the Fairtrade certification fee. Next year’s work will focus on the price fixing, improvement of product quality, and reducing the risk involved with production.

Enjoy this post from Zhuoya Lu, the Fairtrade Liaison Officer in China. Lu attended the 2013 General Assembly of the Jiyuan Huakang Beekeeper Professional Association (JHBPA) and presented a workshop on Fairtrade to the group.

Meet Chaogun Cui (left) and Yonghe Wei from JHBPA. In November I joined 242 beekeepers from different regions gathered in Jiyuan, China, for the association’s annual general assembly.

The chairman of JHBPA presented a report on the past year and the 2014 work plan. It had been a difficult year with bad weather in the summer and low yields and quality. Hoping to keep up motivation for the next year, JHBPA gave out awards for the best quality of organic honey, the highest yield, and highest average production (per beehive). Some beekeepers, like Yonghe, received more than 2000 Yuan (450 Euros).

“2013 was a good year for me. With 15 tonnes of production, I received the award for  highest total production and highest average production per beehive. I’m happy,” said Yonghe Wei, who manages 150 beehives with his wife.

“At the end of year, we plan to travel to Hubei to raise bees there and wait until next spring’s blooming season. The beekeeping is hard work, we spend almost ten months per year outdoors and often spend the Chinese spring festival far away from our families.”

Chaoqun Cui, the other beekeeper in the photo, is the youngest in the association at 21 years of age. He follows in his father’s footsteps, also a member of association.

“Beekeeping is different from farming, the know-how is very important. Besides that, the climate and the location also determine the final production,” Cui said.

He wants to learn more from his father. He now owns 86 beehives. Cui is satisfied with his annual income of around 50 000 Yuan (6250 Euros) because he still lives with his parents and doesn’t have many expenses for daily life.

The association is a stable buyer for him and the price offered is quite good. He sells some honey to individuals, but he sells most of the product to the association.

The chairman of JHBPA explained to me that they plan to spend this year’s Premium money on beekeeping medicine and beehives for members, and some to pay the Fairtrade certification fee. Next year’s work will focus on the price fixing, improvement of product quality, and reducing the risk involved with production.

Candelaria Jeronimo Morales picks coffee on her small farm near San Pedro Necta, Guatemala. Candelaria is part of ACODIHUE (Asociacion de Cooperacion al Desarrollo Integral de Huehuetenango), a Fairtrade-certified producer of honey and coffee association in Guatemala.

Candelaria Jeronimo Morales picks coffee on her small farm near San Pedro Necta, Guatemala. Candelaria is part of ACODIHUE (Asociacion de Cooperacion al Desarrollo Integral de Huehuetenango), a Fairtrade-certified producer of honey and coffee association in Guatemala.

fairtrademarkus:

Happy National Honey Month!

Captions and credits (from left to right, top to bottom)

  1. Miguel Angel Garcia, a beekeper associated with Cooperativa Agricola de Apicultores del Petén RL (COADAP), checking hives near Santa Elena, Peten. COADAP is a certified Fairtrade honey producer based in Guatemala. (Credit: Sean Hawkey)
  2. Closeup of a honeycomb. (Credit: Sean Hawkey)
  3. Man-made honeycomb. Cooperativa Integral de Producción Apicultores de Cuilco (CIPAC) certified Fairtrade producer based in Cuilco, Huehuetenango, Guatemala. (Credit: Sean Hawkey)
  4. Alex Juarez of COADAP in his beekeepers veil. (Credit: Sean Hawkey)
  5. Honey dripping from wooden spoon. (Credit: Fairtrade Finland)
  6. Open jar of honey. (Credit: Fairtrade Finland)

It’s National Honey Month in the United States. Great compilation of Fairtrade Honey producers!

Business is buzzing for Fairtrade honey producers at Apicola co-op in Uruguay.

Before the beekeepers formed the co-op, poor rural roads and limited information meant that they had to depend on local middlemen to buy their honey.

Now the Apicola producers determine their own future.  Working together, the 30 members are able to cut out the middlemen and receive higher returns for their products, which they export abroad.


"Fairtrade brought trading security to our business, gave us access to pre-harvest financing of contracts, and improved the quality of our products", says Timoteo Teixeira, Secretary of Pueblo Apicola (pictured on bottom right photo, far left).


Apicola is one of a dozen Fairtrade honey producers worldwide, and the only Fairtrade certified cooperative in the country.  Read more about Apicola co-op on our website.

Omar Valdés is a member of COASABA honey cooperative. We got to see part of his beautiful work, with his beehives and those of his father. Omar Valdés doesn’t own land, so he rents a small piece of property in the outskirts of the city of Santa Bárbara, in the town of Los Mayo. This allows him to leave his bees with access to plenty of food and fresh water, but at the same time it is close to his home. When asked how he thinks his life would be without the cooperative Mr. Omar says: 

My life wouldn’t be the same, neither for my family nor for the region’s beekeeping.

Fairtrade International’s Liaison Officer Ingrid Allende joined COASBA honey cooperative in Chile for their general assembly. The election process was a chance for producers to talk about their organization and their reasons for becoming a cooperative. Read more here…

Omar Valdés is a member of COASABA honey cooperative. We got to see part of his beautiful work, with his beehives and those of his father. Omar Valdés doesn’t own land, so he rents a small piece of property in the outskirts of the city of Santa Bárbara, in the town of Los Mayo. This allows him to leave his bees with access to plenty of food and fresh water, but at the same time it is close to his home. When asked how he thinks his life would be without the cooperative Mr. Omar says: 

My life wouldn’t be the same, neither for my family nor for the region’s beekeeping.


Fairtrade International’s Liaison Officer Ingrid Allende joined COASBA honey cooperative in Chile for their general assembly. The election process was a chance for producers to talk about their organization and their reasons for becoming a cooperative. Read more here…

A sweet trip to the capital of honey continues…Mr. Luis Villarroel Iraira (61), the new elected president of COASBA honey cooperative, has recognized an improvement in his quality of life and that of the producers since they joined Fairtrade. 

“To be part of this cooperative”, he says, “it is necessary to be loyal, to respect the partners and to love the cooperative”.

This has been the key that has kept them together, despite everything. The cooperative is a member of Chile’s national network of beekeepers and prides itself on high technical and sanitary standards. “It is our own business”, adds Iraira with a smile, regarding what has been accomplished throughout the years.
Fairtrade International’s Liaison Officer Ingrid Allende joined COASBA honey cooperative in Chile for their general assembly. The election process was a chance for producers to talk about their organization and their reasons for becoming a cooperative. Read more here…

A sweet trip to the capital of honey continues…

Mr. Luis Villarroel Iraira (61), the new elected president of COASBA honey cooperative, has recognized an improvement in his quality of life and that of the producers since they joined Fairtrade. 

“To be part of this cooperative”, he says, “it is necessary to be loyal, to respect the partners and to love the cooperative”.

This has been the key that has kept them together, despite everything. The cooperative is a member of Chile’s national network of beekeepers and prides itself on high technical and sanitary standards.

“It is our own business”, adds Iraira with a smile, regarding what has been accomplished throughout the years.

Fairtrade International’s Liaison Officer Ingrid Allende joined COASBA honey cooperative in Chile for their general assembly. The election process was a chance for producers to talk about their organization and their reasons for becoming a cooperative. Read more here…

A sweet trip to the capital of honey – Part 1

In an area of widespread poverty thirty five beekeepers got together in 1994 and founded the association COASBA. During Liaison Officer Ingrid Allende’s visit, the cooperative celebrated its general assembly, where they chose the new board. The election was a chance to talk about what the producers think about their organization and their reasons for becoming a cooperative.

COASBA - Cooperativa Apicola Santa Bárbara - is located in the city of Santa Bárbara, a city that was declared the capital of honey in Chile. Being Fairtrade certified beekeepers is a matter of pride for their members, as the sign outside their cooperative shows:



Orgullosos productores de miel certificada Cormecio Justo Fairtrade - Proud producers of honey certified by Fairtrade.

The most obvious benefit of Fairtrade for COASBA is better incomes for the producers. Since joining Fairtrade the beekeepers are earning 20% more for their honey. Each COASBA member has a regular guaranteed income, which enables them to plan.

The Fairtrade Premium is also an important incentive for the partners. COASBA has invested some of the Premium in improving production processes and for administration, which has created several new jobs. COASBA also has built its own processing facilities and has improved the people’s standard of living. In a region where rural poverty is widespread, family finances are far better than before. Crucially, the younger generation can see a future in beekeeping and in running a coop, rather than joining the exodus of young rural unemployed to the bigger towns and cities. COASBA also recently began to provide advisory services for local beekeepers outside the coop, along with programmes in basic beekeeping for the local municipality.

More to come on COASBA soon….

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