Skip to content

Fairtrade

Fairtrade on the road


Please enable JavaScript to make the most out of this website.
Like your coffee? Like it Fairtrade? Then keep up with our friends at  www.fairtradeamerica.org! Fairtrade America is the new organization representing the international Fairtrade system in the USA.
Share this picture & follow along!
In this photo: Birhanu Kabeto, a member of the Fero Cooperative in YIrgalem, Ethiopia, drops coffee cherries into his basket.

Like your coffee? Like it Fairtrade? Then keep up with our friends at  www.fairtradeamerica.org! Fairtrade America is the new organization representing the international Fairtrade system in the USA.

Share this picture & follow along!

In this photo: Birhanu Kabeto, a member of the Fero Cooperative in YIrgalem, Ethiopia, drops coffee cherries into his basket.

Sports clubs, computer literacy training, crèches, a leadership training camp…Bosman wine estate’s Fairtrade project report makes for impressive reading! All these projects were organized by the Joint Body: a committee made up of workers and management on Fairtrade estates and plantations, which manages the Fairtrade Premium money and consults with their fellow workers on the best way to spend it.One particularly interesting initiative is a gardening competition: Workers compete for prizes for best ornamental garden and best food garden. As well as creating a sense of pride in their homes and community, the competition also helps the workers to grow their own fruit and vegetables and become more self-sufficient. The winners receive vouchers for the local garden centre, or gardening equipment to spruce up their gardens further.Cilmor wine estate’s Joint Body travelled to Bosman’s to get inspiration for their own Fairtrade projects…and they certainly weren’t disappointed. They came away with many new ideas to share with their fellow workers and a much broader view of what is possible with a committed and hard-working Joint Body.Read more about the Cilmor exchange visit here.

Sports clubs, computer literacy training, crèches, a leadership training camp…Bosman wine estate’s Fairtrade project report makes for impressive reading!

All these projects were organized by the Joint Body: a committee made up of workers and management on Fairtrade estates and plantations, which manages the Fairtrade Premium money and consults with their fellow workers on the best way to spend it.

One particularly interesting initiative is a gardening competition: Workers compete for prizes for best ornamental garden and best food garden. As well as creating a sense of pride in their homes and community, the competition also helps the workers to grow their own fruit and vegetables and become more self-sufficient. The winners receive vouchers for the local garden centre, or gardening equipment to spruce up their gardens further.

Cilmor wine estate’s Joint Body travelled to Bosman’s to get inspiration for their own Fairtrade projects…and they certainly weren’t disappointed. They came away with many new ideas to share with their fellow workers and a much broader view of what is possible with a committed and hard-working Joint Body.

Read more about the Cilmor exchange visit here.

image

Malin Olofsson, Fairtrade liaison officer in South Africa joins Fairtrade wine producers on a journey of discovery….

 “Tell me and I forget, teach me and I may remember, involve me and I learn.” – Benjamin Franklin

Exchange visits are a great way of involving producers in a more active approach to learning. To see what other farms have achieved and to learn from their struggles, mistakes and achievements is an invaluable experience.

Workers from Cilmor wine farm in South Africa were recently able to benefit from such a visit. Having been inspired by stories from other Fairtrade farms at a workshop, they wanted to go and see their projects first-hand. So they planned it into their budget, and I happily accompanied them on their trip!

First stop was Fairhills, another wine farm in the Western Cape. They shared about their many various projects to date, giving details about the process and challenges along the way. What was most interesting for the Cilmor group was to find out just how much support, both in cash and in kind, they have being able to leverage as a result of being Fairtrade certified. By approaching individual retailers and government departments they have received funding for specific projects such as a library, computer centre and building a primary school. This means they can use their Fairtrade Premium income to fund the day-to-day running of the projects.

image

They have even been able to hire a psychologist and set up a rehabilitation programme: a really valuable investment for a community where alcoholism is rife. This approach left the Cilmor visitors with much food for thought.

The women of the Tighanimine Cooperative 
The fact that Agadir in southwest Morocco has an abundance of argan trees was not lost on a group of village women in a literacy class organized by Nadia Fatmi. They also knew that their region was very poor, and they had no means of generating income for themselves.
Given that argan trees only grow in that part of the world, and that the oil had been a staple in homes in the village for some time, the women in Fatmi’s literacy class decided to do something to lift themselves out of poverty.
In 2007, they started the world’s first argan oil cooperative - Tighanimine - which became Fairtrade certified in 2011.
"It is the ancestral work of women in the south of Morocco," says Tighanimine spokeswoman, Afafe Daoud. "They are the only ones who can break the fruit and extract the oil."
Argan oil has become a key ingredient of luxury cosmetics, and quickly found markets around the world.
By forming a cooperative, the 60 women farmers of Tighanimine challenged a long-standing tradition in their area that a woman’s husband or father was the sole bread-winner.
"They were financially dependent on men, one hundred percent" says Daoud.
Initially, the men resisted the women’s initiative – that is, until the extra money started to come in.
"Little by little, when they began to see the economic benefits, they became more cooperative and even encouraged other women to join the cooperative," Daoud recalls..
Tighanimine’s Fairtrade volume remains relatively low, but the cooperative was recently licensed to sell their argan oil with the FAIRTRADE Mark. They have developed their own brand called Tounaroz and plan to sell in Morocco, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Spain, and the USA. Moving up the value chain ensures that even more benefits reach the women in the cooperative.
In addition to developments on the market side, the cooperative was given an award by the Moroccan Network for Social and Solidarity Economy and the Pan-African Institute for Development for its work in good governance and economic development. And, Fatmi has since been elected to the chair of Fairtrade North African Board.
Daoud says it’s easy to see some of the effects Tighanimine has had on the women – such as nicer clothes for themselves or their children, or households that are better maintained. Other benefits, says Daoud, are less obvious.
"Women who work in the cooperative began to have more confidence in themselves, because they feel important in their home."
Read more stories of Fairtrade women in our piece celebrating Internationa Women’s Day last Friday.

The women of the Tighanimine Cooperative

The fact that Agadir in southwest Morocco has an abundance of argan trees was not lost on a group of village women in a literacy class organized by Nadia Fatmi. They also knew that their region was very poor, and they had no means of generating income for themselves.

Given that argan trees only grow in that part of the world, and that the oil had been a staple in homes in the village for some time, the women in Fatmi’s literacy class decided to do something to lift themselves out of poverty.

In 2007, they started the world’s first argan oil cooperative - Tighanimine - which became Fairtrade certified in 2011.

"It is the ancestral work of women in the south of Morocco," says Tighanimine spokeswoman, Afafe Daoud. "They are the only ones who can break the fruit and extract the oil."

Argan oil has become a key ingredient of luxury cosmetics, and quickly found markets around the world.

By forming a cooperative, the 60 women farmers of Tighanimine challenged a long-standing tradition in their area that a woman’s husband or father was the sole bread-winner.

"They were financially dependent on men, one hundred percent" says Daoud.

Initially, the men resisted the women’s initiative – that is, until the extra money started to come in.

"Little by little, when they began to see the economic benefits, they became more cooperative and even encouraged other women to join the cooperative," Daoud recalls..

Tighanimine’s Fairtrade volume remains relatively low, but the cooperative was recently licensed to sell their argan oil with the FAIRTRADE Mark. They have developed their own brand called Tounaroz and plan to sell in Morocco, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Spain, and the USA. Moving up the value chain ensures that even more benefits reach the women in the cooperative.

In addition to developments on the market side, the cooperative was given an award by the Moroccan Network for Social and Solidarity Economy and the Pan-African Institute for Development for its work in good governance and economic development. And, Fatmi has since been elected to the chair of Fairtrade North African Board.

Daoud says it’s easy to see some of the effects Tighanimine has had on the women – such as nicer clothes for themselves or their children, or households that are better maintained. Other benefits, says Daoud, are less obvious.

"Women who work in the cooperative began to have more confidence in themselves, because they feel important in their home."

Read more stories of Fairtrade women in our piece celebrating Internationa Women’s Day last Friday.

Kady Waylie, a cotton farmer in Sitaoulé Bananding, Senegal, throws freshly picked cotton onto a heap. The harvest is a celebration that marks the end of a season’s hard work.
Photo by Sean Hawkey, who has a photo exhibition coming up in Dublin for Fairtrade Fortnight. Check out all the Fairtrade Fortnight activities throughout the UK and Ireland!

Kady Waylie, a cotton farmer in Sitaoulé Bananding, Senegal, throws freshly picked cotton onto a heap. The harvest is a celebration that marks the end of a season’s hard work.

Photo by Sean Hawkey, who has a photo exhibition coming up in Dublin for Fairtrade Fortnight. Check out all the Fairtrade Fortnight activities throughout the UK and Ireland!

We were all saddened and shocked at the loss of Raul del Aguila, a global leader for trade justice, a dedicated fair trader, a coffee man, and a friend.
“Raúl was a tireless servant advocating for trade justice and pushing for the interests of the small producers everywhere,” said Marike de Pena, Vice-Chair of the Board at Fairtrade International, President of CLAC, and Director of Banelino, a banana cooperative in the Dominican Republic.
Read more here

We were all saddened and shocked at the loss of Raul del Aguila, a global leader for trade justice, a dedicated fair trader, a coffee man, and a friend.

“Raúl was a tireless servant advocating for trade justice and pushing for the interests of the small producers everywhere,” said Marike de Pena, Vice-Chair of the Board at Fairtrade International, President of CLAC, and Director of Banelino, a banana cooperative in the Dominican Republic.

Read more here

Members of COPROCAEL, a Honduran coffee cooperative, stand in front of a member’s coffee field. COPROCAEL is also the first Fairtrade organization to receive a loan from the Fairtrade Access Fund, a new initiative from Fairtrade International, Incofin and Grameen Foundation to provide affordable finance options to producers.

Members of COPROCAEL, a Honduran coffee cooperative, stand in front of a member’s coffee field. COPROCAEL is also the first Fairtrade organization to receive a loan from the Fairtrade Access Fund, a new initiative from Fairtrade International, Incofin and Grameen Foundation to provide affordable finance options to producers.

“What’s the most important change you’d like to see in your region?” I asked the cotton farmers of ‘Pratibha - Vasudha Jaivik Krishi Kalyan Samiti’. “We wish our children could get better education and communicate in English one day,” they replied.  So I trained them on Fairtrade Premium project planning, using a school project as an example. 

That session is now three years back. Since then, these cotton farmers have come a long way.  They saved their Fairtrade Premium and set up “Vasudha Vidya Vihar”: their own school to impart quality education to poor children from farming community.  After starting in 2010 with very basic infrastructure and just a small number of children, the school now imparts quality education at a reasonable fee to 425 students from very remote villages of Karhi, Khargone district in Central India.  The school now generates enough revenue to meet its operational expenses.

“So, what is the plan now?” I asked during our latest review meeting.  ‘We want to develop this school up to degree college level” the farmers answered.  “And what if your kids decide not to work on the farms when they are highly educated?” I ask, slightly provocatively.  “They would become better farmers and apply new techniques on farms once they are educated’, is the confident reply. 

The farmers are concerned that they might not have enough funds to realize this vision in the short term, due to falling Fairtrade cotton sales in their region. Nevertheless, their commitment and determination to make it happen is plain to see.

Anup Singh is a Fairtrade liaison officer in the North of India.


Many cotton farmers around the world are benefitting from Fairtrade, but struggling to get enough sales to drive bigger change in their communities. We are working on a new model for Fairtrade cotton, which will lead to allow more companies to engage with us and mean more sales for farmers. More news on this later this year!

benandjerrys:

As we continue our journey to become fully Fairtrade, we’re excited to announce we’ll be partnering with Fairtrade International to certify our products in the US. You will see their logo adorning all our ice cream, frozen yogurts, and sorbets by the end of this year.

Great stuff to see here! Thanks friends! Happy to see you in the Tumblr-verse!

benandjerrys:

As we continue our journey to become fully Fairtrade, we’re excited to announce we’ll be partnering with Fairtrade International to certify our products in the US. You will see their logo adorning all our ice cream, frozen yogurts, and sorbets by the end of this year.

Great stuff to see here! Thanks friends! Happy to see you in the Tumblr-verse!

This little piece of paper is important. When a farmer delivers his/her coffee to the co-op, they receive a receipt and the co-op keeps a copy. At the end of the season the farmer collects his/her pay along with an extra bonus if the co-op made more on the sales of their coffee and the co-op receives the Fairtrade Premium on top of that. Co-op members decide democratically how best to use that for their community.

This little piece of paper is important. When a farmer delivers his/her coffee to the co-op, they receive a receipt and the co-op keeps a copy. At the end of the season the farmer collects his/her pay along with an extra bonus if the co-op made more on the sales of their coffee and the co-op receives the Fairtrade Premium on top of that. Co-op members decide democratically how best to use that for their community.

More posts...

Back to top of page